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Vitamin D

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is naturally present in very few foods, added to others, and available as a dietary supplement. It is also produced endogenously when ultraviolet rays from sunlight strike the skin and trigger vitamin D synthesis. Vitamin D obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements is biologically inert and must undergo two hydroxylations in the body for activation. The first occurs in the liver and converts vitamin D.

Why vitamin D is important

Vitamin D helps regulate the amount of calcium and phosphate in the body. These nutrients are needed to keep bones, teeth and muscles healthy. A lack of vitamin D can lead to bone deformities such as rickets in children, and bone pain caused by a condition called osteomalacia in adults.

Indications of vitamin D deficiency

Vitamin D insufficiency leads to secondary hyperparathyroidism that causes increased bone loss, osteopenia, osteomalacia, osteoporosis, and increased fracture risk. … A severe vitamin D deficiency can cause myopathy, which can cause muscle weakness and pain.

Foods that have vitamin D

Fish: salmon, sardines, mackerel, tuna

Cod liver oil

Mushrooms

Egg yolks

Recommended dietary allowance ( RDA )

Age                           male                  female
0 –  12 months       400 iu                 400 iu
                                ( 10 mcg )        ( 10 mcg )

1- 13  years           600 iu                  600 iu
                                ( 15 mcg )        ( 15 mcg )

14 – 18  years       600 iu                  600 iu
                               ( 15 mcg )        ( 15 mcg )  

19 – 50 years         600 iu                  600 iu
                               ( 15 mcg )         ( 15 mcg ) 

51- 70  years         600 iu                  600 iu
                               ( 15 mcg )         ( 15 mcg )

>70 years             800 iu                  800 iu
                              ( 20 mcg)           ( 20 mcg )